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About the Author(s)

Matthew Neidell

Matthew Neidell is an economics professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. He received his Ph.D. in economics from UCLA, and was a post-doc at the University of Chicago prior to joining Columbia. He has held visiting positions at the European University Institute and the Property and Environment Research Center. His fields of specialization are environmental, health, and labor economics, with research primarily focused at the intersections of these. His most recent work applies the latest empirical methods to examine the relationship between the environment and a wide range of measures of well-being, including worker productivity, human capital, and decision making. Neidell is currently a co-editor at the Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, a research associate in the NBER's Health Economics and Environment and Energy Economics programs, and a research fellow at the Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

Endnotes

1. M. Neidell, "Information, Avoidance Behavior, and Health: The Effect of Ozone on Asthma Hospitalizations," NBER Working Paper 14209, July 2008, and The Journal of Human Resources, 44(2), 2009, pp. 450-78.   Go to ⤴︎
2. J. Graff Zivin and M. Neidell, "Days of Haze: Environmental Information Disclosure and Intertemporal Avoidance Behavior," NBER Working Paper 14271, August 2008, and Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, 58(2), 2009.   Go to ⤴︎
3. J. Graff Zivin and M. Neidell, "The Impact of Pollution on Worker Productivity," NBER Working Paper 17004, April 2011, and American Economic Review, 102(7), 2012, pp. 3652-73.   Go to ⤴︎
4. T. Chang, J. Graff Zivin, T. Gross, and M. Neidell, "Particulate Pollution and the Productivity of Pear Packers," NBER Working Paper 19944, February 2014, and American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, 8(3), 2016, pp. 141-69.   Go to ⤴︎
5. T. Chang, J. Graff Zivin, T. Gross, and M. Neidell, "The Effect of Pollution on Worker Productivity: Evidence from Call-Center Workers in China," NBER Working Paper 22328, June 2016.   Go to ⤴︎
6. N. Bloom, J. Liang, J. Roberts, and Z. Ying, "Does Working from Home Work? Evidence from a Chinese Experiment," NBER Working Paper 18871, March 2013, and The Quarterly Journal of Economics, 130(1), 2015, pp. 165-218.   Go to ⤴︎
7. A. Heyes, M. Neidell, and S. Saberian, "The Effect of Air Pollution on Investor Behavior: Evidence from the S&P 500," NBER Working Paper 22753, October 2016.   Go to ⤴︎
8. A. Barreca, M. Neidell, and N. Sanders, "Long-Run Pollution Exposure and Adult Mortality: Evidence from the Acid Rain Program," NBER Working Paper 23524, June 2017. Go to ⤴︎

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