NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
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The Polarization of Reality

Alberto F. Alesina, Armando Miano, Stefanie Stantcheva

NBER Working Paper No. 26675
Issued in January 2020
NBER Program(s):Public Economics, Political Economy

Americans are polarized not only in their views on policy issues and attitudes towards government and society, but also in their perceptions of the same factual reality. We conceptualize how to think about the “polarization of reality” and review recent papers that show that Republicans and Democrats view the same reality through a different lens. Perhaps, as a result, they hold different views about policies and what should be done to address economic and social issues. We also show that providing information leads to different reassessments of reality and different responses along the policy support margin, depending on one's political leaning.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w26675

Published: Alberto Alesina & Armando Miano & Stefanie Stantcheva, 2020. "The Polarization of Reality," AEA Papers and Proceedings, vol 110, pages 324-328. citation courtesy of

 
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