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Jonathan Skinner is a Research Associate of the NBER's programs in aging, health care, and public eco-nomics. Skinner is the John Sloan Dickey Third Century Professor in Economics at Dartmouth College and a Professor of Community and Family Medicine at Dartmouth Medical School, where he works with the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice. Dr. Skinner is a member of the Board of Editors of the American Economic Journals: Economic Policy and the...
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Amitabh Chandra is a Research Associate of the NBER's programs in aging, health care, children, education, and labor economics. Chandra is a Professor at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. Dr. Chandra is a Co-Editor of the Journal of Human Resources, and a member of the Editorial Boards of the American Economic Journal: Applied, the Forum in Health Economics and Policy and Economic Letters. He is a Research Fellow of the Institute for the Study of...
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John Cawley is a Research Associate of the NBER's programs in health care and health economics. He is an Associate Professor and the Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Policy Analysis and Management at Cornell University. John's research focuses on the economics of obesity. He has studied possible economic causes of obesity (such as income and food advertising), possible economic consequences of obesity (such as lower wages and higher medical care costs...
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Economic Dimensions of Personalized and Precision Medicine Ernst R. Berndt, Dana P. Goldman, and John W. Rowe, editors Personalized and precision medicine (PPM) — the targeting of therapies according to an individual's genetic, environmental, or lifestyle characteristics — is becoming an increasingly important approach in health care treatment and prevention. The advancement of PPM is a challenge in traditional clinical, reimbursement, and regulatory landscapes...
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Industrial Organization Members of the NBER's Industrial Organization Program met February 8–9 at Stanford. Research Associates Eric Budish of the University of Chicago and Jean-François Houde of the University of Wisconsin-Madison organized the meeting. These researchers' papers were presented and discussed: Thomas G. Wollmann, University of Chicago and NBER, "How to Get Away with Merger: Stealth Consolidation and Its Effects on U.S. Healthcare" Sumit Agarwal,...

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    After the outbreak of COVID-19, more-experienced and higher-quality job applicants shifted from early-stage companies to the safety of more-established firms. Like investors who reallocate their portfolios toward safer assets during volatile times in financial markets, job seekers during the COVID-19 pandemic have shifted their focus from startup businesses to larger firms. During the pandemic, small and young entrepreneurial firms have had fewer job applicants —...
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    While the cost of mandating use of electric heating in new homes in Florida would average only $85 a year, in some Northern states it could top $4,000. The share of American homes heated with electricity was only 1 percent in 1950 but has increased steadily to 39 percent in 2018. In What Matters for Electrification? Evidence from 70 Years of US Home Heating Choices (NBER Working Paper 28324), Lucas W. Davis investigates the key determinants of this increase using...

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