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About the Author(s)

Nicholas Muller Profile

Nicholas Muller is the Lester and Judith Lave Professor of Economics, Engineering, and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University and is on the faculties of the Department of Engineering and Public Policy and the Tepper School of Business. He is an NBER research associate affiliated with the Environment and Energy Economics Program.

Muller teaches microeconomics, benefit-cost analysis, environmental and natural resource economics, and energy policy. Much of his research focuses on the development and subsequent use of integrated assessment models for air pollution. He uses these tools to measure air pollution damage and to inform the design of market-based policies. His current work focuses on global environmental accounting and sustainability, estimating air pollution and greenhouse gas damage in the US economy in 2017, air pollution policy and municipal finance systems, and developing environmental performance measures for ESG indices. He is the director of the Tepper School’s Sustainability Initiative and a coeditor of the Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists.

Muller has consulted for federal, state, and local governments, environmental advocacy groups, and publicly traded firms. From 2015 to 2017, he served on the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s Scientific Advisory Board. Muller has published papers in the American Economic Review, Science, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Nature Sustainability, and Nature Climate Change. He earned his PhD from Yale University’s School of the Environment.

Endnotes

1. Is Growth Obsolete?” Nordhaus W, Tobin J. In The Measurement of Economic and Social Performance, Moss M, editor. New York, NBER, 1973.   Go to ⤴︎
2. The Growth of Nations Revisited: Global Environmental Accounting from 1998 to 2018,” Mohan A, Muller N, Thyagarajan A, Martin R, Hammer M, van Donkelaar A. NBER Working Paper 27398, June 2020.   Go to ⤴︎
3. An Analysis of the Association between US Mortality and Air Pollution,” Lave L, Seskin E. Journal of the American Statistical Association 68(342), 1973, pp. 284–290.   Go to ⤴︎
4. The Life You Save May Be Your Own,” Schelling T. In Problems in Public Expenditure Analysis, Chase, Jr. S, editor, pp. 127–162. Washington, Brookings Institution, 1968. This work and its intellectual lineage was documented by H. S. Banzhaf in “The Cold-War Origins of the Value of a Statistical Life,” Journal of Economic Perspectives 28(4), Fall 2014, pp. 213–226.   Go to ⤴︎
5. Toward the Measurement of Net Economic Welfare: Air Pollution Damage in the US National Accounts — 2002, 2005, 2008,” Muller N. In Measuring Economic Sustainability and Progress, Jorgensen D, Landefeld JS, Schreyer P, editors. Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 2014.   Go to ⤴︎
6. Ibid.   Go to ⤴︎
7. Environmental Accounting for Pollution in the United States Economy,” Muller N, Mendelsohn R, Nordhaus W. American Economic Review 101(5), August 2011, pp. 1649–1675.   Go to ⤴︎
9. Fine Particulate Matter Damages and Value Added in the US Economy,” Tschofen P, Azevedo I, Muller N. PNAS 116 (40), October 1, 2019, 19857–19862.   Go to ⤴︎
11. Ibid.   Go to ⤴︎
12. Ibid.   Go to ⤴︎
13. On the Green Interest Rate,” Muller N. NBER Working Paper 28891, June 2021.   Go to ⤴︎
14. Intergenerational Equity and the Investing of Rents from Exhaustible Resources,” Hartwick J. American Economic Review 67(5), December 1977, pp. 972–974.   Go to ⤴︎
15. The Growth of Nations Revisited: Global Environmental Accounting from 1998 to 2018,” Mohan A, Muller N, Thyagarajan A, Martin R, Hammer M, van Donkelaar A. NBER Working Paper 27398, June 2020.   Go to ⤴︎
16. The Green Solow Model,” Brock W, Taylor M. Journal of Economic Growth 15(2), June 2010, pp. 127–153.     Go to ⤴︎
17. Consequences of the Clean Water Act and the Demand for Water Quality,” Keiser D, Shapiro J. NBER Working Paper 23070, June 2018. Go to ⤴︎

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