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About the Author(s)

Gordon B. Dahl

Gordon B. Dahl is a research associate in the NBER’s Labor Studies Program. He currently is a professor of economics at the University of California, San Diego and began his career at the University of Rochester. He serves as Area Director for Labor Economics for the CESifo Network, and is affiliated with the Norwegian School of Economics, the Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), and the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality. He is an associate editor for the American Economic Review and Economic Inquiry.

Dahl’s research interests are in labor economics and applied microeconomics, including a wide set of issues that range from how income affects child achievement, to peer effects among coworkers and family members, to the impact of incarceration on recidivism and employment, to intergenerational links in welfare use. He received a bachelor’s degree from Brigham Young University in 1993 and a PhD from Princeton University in 1998.

Gordon and his wife, Katherine, have four daughters, all of whom enjoy the sunshine of San Diego and traveling abroad.

Magne Mogstad

Magne Mogstad is the Gary S. Becker Professor in Economics and the College in the Kenneth C. Griffin Department of Economics at the University of Chicago. He also is the director of the Ronzetti Initiative for the Study of Labor Markets at the university’s Becker Friedman Institute. His work is motivated by the broad question of how to address market failures and equalize opportunities. Countless policies — taxation, subsidized education, social insurance — have been implemented in an effort to achieve those objectives. A key challenge is to distill each policy’s unique impact so that it can be understood which ones actually work and which do not. This challenge motivates Mogstad’s work, which aims at providing credible empirical evidence that informs policymakers. This is made possible by combining theory and econometric methods with large administrative datasets that can be linked to supplementary data sources.

Mogstad has published extensively in leading scholarly journals. He is a current coeditor of the Journal of Political Economy, and he previously served as a coeditor of the Journal of Public Economics and a foreign editor of The Review of Economic Studies. He is a recipient of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Fellowship and the 2017 IZA Young Labor Economist Award.

Endnotes

1. “What Works? Questions and Answers about Prison Reform,” Martinson R. The Public Interest 35, Spring 1974, pp. 22–54. Go to ⤴︎
2. “Imprisonment and Reoffending,” Nagin DS, Cullen FT, Jonson CL. Crime and Justice 38(1), 2009, pp. 115–200. Go to ⤴︎
3. “Incarceration, Recidivism and Employment,” Bhuller M, Dahl GB, Løken KV, Mogstad M. NBER Working Paper 22648, September 2016, revised February 2019, and Journal of Political Economy, forthcoming. Go to ⤴︎
4. “Intergenerational Effects of Incarceration,” Bhuller M, Dahl GB, Løken KV, Mogstad M. NBER Working Paper 24227, January 2018, and AEA Papers and Proceedings 108, May 2018, pp. 234–240. Go to ⤴︎
5. “Incarceration Spillovers in Criminal and Family Networks,” Bhuller M, Dahl GB, Løken KV, Mogstad M. NBER Working Paper 24878, August 2018. Go to ⤴︎

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