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About the Author(s)

Meer

Jonathan Meer is an associate professor of economics at Texas A&M University. He is a research associate in the NBER's Education and Public Economics Programs and a professor at Texas A&M's Private Enterprise Research Center.

Meer received his bachelor's degree in economics from Princeton University in 2002 and his PhD in economics from Stanford University in 2009. He won the CASE H.S. Warwick Award for Outstanding Research in Alumni Relations for Educational Advancement in 2009 and 2012. He was cofounder of an online Principles of Microeconomics course at Texas A&M that reaches 3,000 students per year.

Meer's research interests include charitable giving, the economics of education, and the economics of low-skill labor markets. He lives in College Station with his wife and two children.

Rosen

Harvey S. Rosen is the John L. Weinberg Professor of Economics and Business Policy at Princeton University. He was an undergraduate at the University of Michigan and received his PhD from Harvard University. He has been a member of Princeton's Department of Economics since 1974, serving as department chair from 1993 to 1996 and as codirector of the Center for Economic Policy Studies from 1993 to 2011. He was the inaugural master of Whitman College, Princeton's sixth undergraduate residential college.

Rosen has been involved in both the graduate and undergraduate teaching programs at Princeton. In recent years, he has taught courses in public finance, taxation, and introductory and intermediate microeconomics. From 1989 to 1991 he served in the U.S. Department of the Treasury as deputy assistant secretary for tax analysis. During a second stint in Washington, from 2003 to 2005, he served on the President's Council of Economic Advisers, first as a member and then as chair, providing advice to the White House on tax reform, Social Security, health care, energy, the federal budget, and financial market regulation.

Rosen's main field of research is public finance, a topic on which he has published several dozen articles in scholarly journals and an undergraduate textbook. He was elected a Fellow of the Econometric Society in 2006, and in 2007 received the National Tax Association's Daniel M. Holland Medal, for distinguished lifetime contributions to the study and practice of public finance.

Endnotes

1. Giving USA, "Total Charitable Donations Rise to New High of $390.05 Billion," June 12, 2017, https://bit.ly/2spZqlL   Go to ⤴︎
2. Council for Aid to Education, "Colleges and Universities Raise $41 Billion in 2016," February 7, 2017,    Go to ⤴︎
3. J. Meer and H. Rosen, "Altruism and the Child-Cycle of Alumni Giving," NBER Working Paper 13152, June 2007, and published as "Altruism and the Child Cycle of Alumni Donations," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, 1(1), 2009, pp. 258–86.   Go to ⤴︎
4. K. Butcher, C. Kearns, and P. McEwan, "Giving Till it Helps? Alumnae Giving and Children’s College Options," Research in Higher Education, 54(5), 2013, pp. 481–98.   Go to ⤴︎
5. C. Eckel, D. Herberich, and J. Meer, "A Field Experiment on Directed Giving at a Public University," NBER Working Paper 20180, May 2014, and Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics, 66, 2017, pp. 66–71.   Go to ⤴︎
6. J. Meer and H. Rosen, "Does Generosity Beget Generosity? Alumni Giving and Undergraduate Financial Aid," NBER Working Paper 17861, February 2012, and Economics of Education Review, 31(6), 2012, pp. 890–907.   Go to ⤴︎
7. J. Meer, "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime: Peer Pressure in Charitable Solicitation," Journal of Public Economics, 95(7-8), 2011, pp. 926–41.   Go to ⤴︎
8. J. Meer and H. Rosen, "The ABCs of Charitable Solicitation," NBER Working Paper 15037, June 2009, and Journal of Public Economics, 95(5-6), 2011, pp. 363–71.   Go to ⤴︎
9. C. Eckel, D. Herberich, and J. Meer, "It's Not the Thought That Counts: A Field Experiment on Gift Exchange and Giving at a Public University," NBER Working Paper 22867, November 2016, and forthcoming in The Economics of Philanthropy.   Go to ⤴︎
10. J. Meer, "Effects of the Price of Charitable Giving: Evidence from an Online Crowdfunding Platform," NBER Working Paper 19082, May 2013, and Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, 103, 2014, pp. 113–24. Go to ⤴︎
11. J. Meer and H. Rosen, "The Impact of Athletic Performance on Alumni Giving: An Analysis of Micro Data," NBER Working Paper 13937, April 2008, and Economics of Education Review, 28(3), 2009, pp. 287–94.   Go to ⤴︎
12. J. Martinez, J. Stinson, M. Kang, and C. Jubenville, "Intercollegiate Athletics and Institutional Fundraising: A Meta-Analysis," Sports Marketing Quarterly, 19(1), 2010, pp. 36–47.   Go to ⤴︎
13. J. Meer and H. Rosen, "Family Bonding With Universities," NBER Working Paper 15493, November 2009, and Research in Higher Education, 51(7), 2010, pp. 641–58.   Go to ⤴︎
14. J. Meer, "The Habit of Giving," Economic Inquiry, 51(4), 2013, pp. 2002–17.   Go to ⤴︎
15. H. Rosen and S. Sims, "Altruistic Behavior and Habit Formation," Nonprofit Management & Leadership, 21(3), 2011, pp. 235–53. Go to ⤴︎
16. J. Meer and H. Rosen, "Donative Behavior at the End of Life," NBER Working Paper 19145, June 2013, and Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, 92, 2013, pp. 192–201. Go to ⤴︎

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