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About the Researcher(s)/Author(s)

Photo of Jonathan Skinner

Jonathan Skinner is a Research Associate in the NBER's Programs on Health Care, Aging, and Public Economics. His is also James O. Freedman Presidential Professor in Economics at Dartmouth College and a professor at the Geisel School of Medicine's Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice.

Skinner's research interests include the economics of government transfer programs, technology growth and disparities in health care, and the savings behavior of aging baby boomers. He is an associate editor of the American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, and a former editor of the Journal of Human Resources. In 2007 he was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. Skinner received his M.A. and Ph.D. in Economics from UCLA, and a B.A. in political science and economics from the University of Rochester. He has also taught at the University of Virginia, the University of Washington, Stanford University, and Harvard University.

Skinner lives with his wife, Martha, in Hanover, New Hampshire, where bears are occasional visitors to their backyard. He enjoys hiking, Nordic skiing, and sailing, particularly with family and coauthors.

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