NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
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Do Cash Windfalls Affect Wages? Evidence from R&D Grants to Small Firms

Sabrina T. Howell, J. David Brown

NBER Working Paper No. 26717
Issued in January 2020
NBER Program(s):Corporate Finance, Environment and Energy Economics, Labor Studies, Public Economics, Productivity, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship

This paper examines how employee earnings at small firms respond to a cash flow shock in the form of a government R&D grant. We use ranking data on applicant firms, which we link to IRS W2 earnings and other U.S. Census Bureau datasets. In a regression discontinuity design, we find that the grant increases average earnings with a rent-sharing elasticity of 0.07 (0.21) at the employee (firm) level. The beneficiaries are incumbent employees who were present at the firm before the award. Among incumbent employees, the effect increases with worker tenure. The grant also leads to higher employment and revenue, but productivity growth cannot fully explain the immediate effect on earnings. Instead, the data and a grantee survey are consistent with a backloaded wage contract channel, in which employees of financially constrained firms initially accept relatively low wages and are paid more when cash is available.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w26717

 
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