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About the Author(s)

B. Zorina Khan Profile

Zorina Khan is professor of economics at Bowdoin College, and a research associate in the NBER's Development of the American Economy Program. She has a B.Sc. (First Class Honours) from the University of Surrey in England, and received her Ph.D. in economics from the University of California, Los Angeles, where she was a Fulbright Scholar.

While the recipient of the NBER's biennial Griliches Fellowship for empirical scholarship, Khan completed The Democratization of Invention: Patents and Copyrights in American Economic Development, 1790–1920. The Economic History Association awarded this monograph the Alice Hanson Jones Biennial Prize for an outstanding book in American economic history.

Khan was recently a W. Glenn Campbell and Rita Ricardo-Campbell National Fellow, and an Arch W. Shaw Fellow, at the Hoover Institution. Other awards include the Leonardo da Vinci Fellowship, Adam Smith Medal, Kenan Fellowship, Porter Fellowship, and Senior Fellowship at the Lemelson Center for Invention and Innovation.

Like Marguerite Yourcenar, a favorite French author, Khan has lived in Maine for more than a decade. She and fellow DAE members have tracked down elusive data in remote archives ranging from Paris, France, to settlements in New South Wales, Australia, and even to Paris, Maine.

Endnotes

1. B. Z. Khan, The Democratization of Invention: Patents and Copyrights in American Economic Development, 1790–1920, New York, New York: Cambridge University Press, 2005.   Go to ⤴︎
2. B. Z. Khan, "Looking Backward: Founding Choices in Innovation and Intellectual Property Protection," in D. Irwin and R. Sylla, eds., Founding Choices: American Economic Policy in the 1790s, Chicago, Illinois: University of Chicago Press, 2010, pp. 315–42.   Go to ⤴︎
3. B. Z. Khan and K. L. Sokoloff, "Institutions and Technological Innovation during the Early Economic Growth: Evidence from the Great Inventors of the United States, 1790–1930," NBER Working Paper 10966, December 2004, and American Economic Review, 94 (2) 2004, pp. 395–401, and in T. Eicher and C. Garcia-Penalosa, eds., Institutions and Economic Growth, Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press, 2006, pp. 123–58.   Go to ⤴︎
4. B. Z. Khan, "Knowledge, Human Capital and Economic Development: Evidence from the British Industrial Revolution, 1750–1930," NBER Working Paper 20853, January 2015.   Go to ⤴︎
5. B. Z. Khan, "War and the Returns to Entrepreneurial Innovation among U.S. Patentees, 1790–1870," Brussels Economic Review, 52 (3/4), 2009, pp. 239–74.   Go to ⤴︎
6. B. Z. Khan, "The Impact of War on Resource Allocation: 'Creative Destruction' and the American Civil War," NBER Working Paper 20944, February 2015, and Journal of Interdisciplinary History, 46 (3), 2015, pp. 315–53.   Go to ⤴︎
7. N. Lamoreaux and K. L. Sokoloff, "Intermediaries in the U.S. Market for Technology, 1870-1920," NBER Working Paper 9017, June 2002, and in S. L. Engerman, P. T. Hoffman, J.-L. Rosenthal, and K. L. Sokoloff, eds., Finance, Intermediaries, and Economic Development, New York, New York: Cambridge University Press, 2003, pp. 209–46.   Go to ⤴︎
8. B. Z. Khan, "Selling Ideas: An International Perspective on Patenting and Markets for Technology, 1790–1930," Business History Review, 87 (1), 2013, pp. 39–68.   Go to ⤴︎
9. B. Z. Khan, The Democratization of Invention: Patents and Copyrights in American Economic Development, 1790–1920, New York, New York: Cambridge University Press, 2005.   Go to ⤴︎
10. B. Z. Khan, "Inventing Prizes: A Historical Perspective on Innovation Awards and Technology Policy," NBER Working Paper 21375, July 2015, and Business History Review, 89 (4), 2015, pp. 631–60. Go to ⤴︎
11. B. Z. Khan, "Prestige and Profit: The Royal Society of Arts and Incentives for Innovation, 1750–1850," NBER Working Paper 23042, January 2017.   Go to ⤴︎
12. B. Z. Khan, "Inventing Prizes: A Historical Perspective on Innovation Awards and Technology Policy," NBER Working Paper 21375, July 2015, and Business History Review, 89 (4), 2015, pp. 631–60.   Go to ⤴︎
13. The Royal Commission, "Official Catalogue of the Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of All Nations," Robert Ellis, ed., London, United Kingdom: Spicer Brothers, 1851, https://archive.org/stream/officialcatalog06unkngoog#page/n10/mode/2up   Go to ⤴︎
14. B. Z. Khan, "Going for Gold: Industrial Fairs and Innovation in the Nineteenth-Century United States," Revue Économique, 64 (1), 2013, pp. 89–114.   Go to ⤴︎
15. B. Z. Khan, "Premium Inventions: Patents and Prizes as Incentive Mechanisms in Britain and the United States, 1750–1930" in D. L. Costa and N. Lamoreaux, eds., Understanding Long-Run Economic Growth: Geography, Institutions, and the Knowledge Economy, Chicago, Illinois: University of Chicago Press, 2011, pp. 205–34.   Go to ⤴︎
16. B. Z. Khan, "Inventing in the Shadow of the Patent System: Evidence from 19th-Century Patents and Prizes for Technological Innovations," NBER Working Paper 20731, December 2014.   Go to ⤴︎
17. B. Z. Khan, "Antitrust and Innovation before the Sherman Act," Antitrust Law Journal, 77 (3), 2011, pp. 1001–29. Go to ⤴︎
18. B. Z. Khan, "Of Time and Space: Technological Spillovers among Patents and Unpatented Innovations during Early U.S. Industrialization," NBER Working Paper 20732, December 2014.   Go to ⤴︎
19. B. Z. Khan, "Designing Women: Technological Innovation and Creativity in Britain, France and the United States, 1750–1900," NBER Working Paper 23086, January 2017.   Go to ⤴︎
20. B. Z. Khan, " 'Justice of the Marketplace': Legal Disputes and Economic Activity on America's Northeastern Frontier, 1700–1860," Journal of Interdisciplinary History, 39 (1), 2008, pp. 1-35; B. Z. Khan, "Commerce and Cooperation: Litigation and Settlement of Civil Disputes on the Australian Frontier," The Journal of Economic History, 60 (4), 2000, pp. 1088–119.   Go to ⤴︎
21. B. Z. Khan, " 'To Have and Have Not': Are Rich Litigious Plaintiffs Favored in Court?" NBER Working Paper  20945, February 2015.   Go to ⤴︎
22. B. Z. Khan, "Technological Innovations and Endogenous Changes in U.S. Legal Institutions, 1790-1920," NBER Working Paper 10346, March 2004, and "Innovations in Law and Technology, 1790–1920," in M. Grossberg and C. Tomlins, eds., Cambridge History of Law in America, vol. 2, New York, Neew York, Cambridge University Press, 2008, pp. 483–530, 796–801.   Go to ⤴︎
23. B. Z. Khan, "Trolls and Other Patent Inventions: Economic History and the Patent Controversy in the Twenty-First Century," George Mason Law Review, 21, 2014, pp. 825–63.   Go to ⤴︎
24. B. Z. Khan, "Invisible Women: Entrepreneurship, Innovation, and Family Firms in France during Early Industrialization," NBER Working Paper 20854, January 2015, and The Journal of Economic History, 76 (1), 2016, pp. 163–95.   Go to ⤴︎
25. B. Z. Khan, "Married Women's Property Laws and Female Commercial Activity: Evidence from United States Patent Records, 1790–1895," The Journal of Economic History, 56 (2), 1996: 356–88.   Go to ⤴︎
26. B. Z. Khan, "Related Investing: Corporate Ownership and Capital Mobilization during Early Industrialization," NBER Working Paper 23052, January 2017. Go to ⤴︎

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