NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
loading...

Making Progress on Foreign Aid

Nancy Qian

NBER Working Paper No. 20412
Issued in August 2014
NBER Program(s):Development Economics, Political Economy

Foreign aid is one of the most important policy tools that rich countries use for helping poor countries to improve population well-being and facilitate economic and institutional development. The empirical evidence on its benefits is mixed and has generated much controversy. This paper presents descriptive statistics which show that foreign aid to very poor countries accounts for very little of total global aid; reviews the evidence that foreign aid is often determined by the objectives of donor countries rather than the needs of recipient countries; argues that the evidence on the impact of aggregate foreign aid is hindered by problems of measurement and identification, which are partly due to the heterogenous nature of aid; and discusses recent studies using natural and randomized experiments to examine narrowed definitions of aid on more disaggregated outcomes.

download in pdf format
   (676 K)

email paper

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w20412

Published: Nancy Qian, 2015. "Making Progress on Foreign Aid," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 7(1), pages 277-308, 08. citation courtesy of

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded* these:
Kast and Pomeranz w20239 Saving More to Borrow Less: Experimental Evidence from Access to Formal Savings Accounts in Chile
Glaeser, Gottlieb, and Ziv w20291 Unhappy Cities
La Porta and Shleifer w20205 Informality and Development
Acemoglu, Naidu, Restrepo, and Robinson w20004 Democracy Does Cause Growth
Ambler, Aycinena, and Yang w20262 Channeling Remittances to Education: A Field Experiment Among Migrants from El Salvador
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Themes
Data
People
About

National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us