NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
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AI and the Economy

Jason Furman, Robert Seamans

Chapter in NBER book Innovation Policy and the Economy, Volume 19 (2019), Josh Lerner and Scott Stern, editors (p. 161 - 191)
Conference held April 17, 2018
Published in November 2018 by University of Chicago Press
© 2019 by the National Bureau of Economic Research
in NBER Book Series Innovation Policy and the Economy

We review the evidence that artificial intelligence (AI) is having a large effect on the economy. Across a variety of statistics—including robotics shipments, AI startups, and patent counts—there is evidence of a large increase in AI-related activity. We also review recent research in this area which suggests that AI and robotics have the potential to increase productivity growth but may have mixed effects on labor, particularly in the short run. In particular, some occupations and industries may do well while others experience labor market upheaval. We then consider current and potential policies around AI that may help to boost productivity growth while also mitigating any labor market downsides including evaluating the pros and cons of an AI specific regulator, expanded antitrust enforcement, and alternative strategies for dealing with the labor-market impacts of AI, including universal basic income and guaranteed employment.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1086/699936

This chapter first appeared as NBER working paper w24689, AI and the Economy, Jason Furman, Robert Seamans
 
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