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About the Researcher(s)/Author(s)

Matteo_Maggiori

Matteo Maggiori is an associate professor of finance at Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business. His research focuses on international macroeconomics and finance. He is a cofounder and director of the Global Capital Allocation Project.

Maggiori’s research topics have included the analysis of exchange rate dynamics, global capital flows, the international financial system, the role of the dollar as a reserve currency, tax havens, bubbles, expectations and portfolio investment, and very long-run discount rates. His work combines theory and data with the aim of improving international economic policy. 

Maggiori is a research associate affiliated with the NBER’s International Finance and Macroeconomics, Asset Pricing, and Economic Fluctuations and Growth programs, and a research affiliate at the Center for Economic Policy Research. He received his PhD from the University of California, Berkeley. Among a number of honors, he is the recipient of the 2021 Fischer Black Prize for the best financial economist under age 40, a 2019 Guggenheim Fellowship, and the 2019 Carlo Alberto Medal for the best Italian economist under age 40.

Brent Neiman is the Edward Eagle Brown Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business. He conducts research on international macroeconomics, finance, and trade.

Brent Neiman

Brent Neiman is the Edward Eagle Brown Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business. He conducts research on international macroeconomics, finance, and trade.

Neiman is a cofounder and director of the Global Capital Allocation Project and director of the Initiative on International Economics at the Becker Friedman Institute. He is an executive board member of Chicago Booth’s Initiative for Global Markets, a research associate in the NBER’s International Finance and Macroeconomics and International Trade and Investment programs, a research fellow at the Center for Economic Policy Research, and an associate editor of the American Economic ReviewThe Quarterly Journal of Economics, and the Journal of International Economics. He previously served as the staff economist for international finance on the White House Council of Economic Advisers and worked at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago and McKinsey and Company.

He has been the recipient of an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship in Economics, was named an Emerging Leader by the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, and has been a corecipient of the Economics in Central Banking Award and the AQR Insight Award. Neiman was awarded the Thouron Fellowship, which funded his graduate studies at Oxford, after earning both a Bachelor of Science in economics and a Bachelor of Applied Science from the University of Pennsylvania. He earned a master’s degree from Oxford University and completed his PhD in economics at Harvard University.

Jesse Schreger

Jesse Schreger is the Class of 1967 Associate Professor of Business in the economics division at Columbia Business School. His research is primarily in international finance and macroeconomics, with a focus on capital flows, sovereign debt, and frictions in international capital markets.

Schreger is a cofounder and director of the Global Capital Allocation Project, a faculty research fellow at the NBER, a research affiliate at the Center for Economic Policy Research, and an associate editor of the Journal of International Economics. He has been the recipient of a Sloan Research Fellowship and the AQR Asset Management Institute Young Researcher Award, and has been a corecipient of the Economics in Central Banking Award and the AQR Insight Award.

He received his PhD in political economy and government from Harvard University and his BA in economics and international relations from the University of Pennsylvania.

Footnotes

1. “Redrawing the Map of Global Capital Flows: The Role of Cross-Border Financing and Tax Havens,” Coppola A, Maggiori M, Neiman B, Schreger J. NBER Working Paper 26855, December 2020.   Go to ⤴︎
2. “International Currencies and Capital Allocation,” Maggiori M, Neiman B, Schreger J. NBER Working Paper 24673, April 2019, and Journal of Political Economy 128(6), June 2020, pp. 2019–2066.   Go to ⤴︎
3. “The Rise of the Dollar and Fall of the Euro as International Currencies,” Maggiori M, Neiman B, Schreger J. NBER Working Paper 25410, December 2018, and AEA Papers and Proceedings 109, May 2019, pp. 521–526.     Go to ⤴︎
4. “Exchange Rate Reconnect,” Lilley A, Maggiori M, Neiman B, Schreger J. NBER Working Paper 26046, December 2019, and Review of Economics and Statistics, 2021, forthcoming.   Go to ⤴︎

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