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Food, Fuel and the Domesday Economy

Juan Moreno-Cruz, M. Scott Taylor

NBER Working Paper No. 27414
Issued in June 2020
NBER Program(s):Development Economics, Environment and Energy Economics

This paper develops a theory where access to food and fuel energy is critical to the location, number, and size of human settlements. By combining our theory with a simple Malthusian mechanism, we generate predictions for the distribution of economic activity and population across geographic space. We evaluate the model using data drawn from the very first census undertaken in the English language - the Domesday census - commissioned by William the Conqueror in 1086 A.D. Using G.I.S. data and techniques we find strong evidence that Malthusian forces determined the population size and the number of settlements in Domesday England.

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Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w27414

Published: Juan Moreno-Cruz & M. Scott Taylor, 2020. "Food, Fuel and the Domesday Economy," European Economic Review, vol 128.

 
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