NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
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Job creation in Colombia vs the U.S.: "up or out dynamics" meets "the life cycle of plants".

Marcela Eslava, John C. Haltiwanger, Alvaro Pinzón

NBER Working Paper No. 25550
Issued in February 2019
NBER Program(s):The Economic Fluctuations and Growth Program, The Productivity, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship Program

There is growing consensus that a key difference between the U.S. and developing economies is that the latter exhibit slower employment growth over the life cycle of the average business. At the same time, the rapid post entry growth in the U.S. is driven by an “up or out dynamic”. We track manufacturing establishments in Colombia vs. the US and find that slower average life cycle growth in Colombia is driven by a less enthusiastic contribution of extraordinary growth plants and less dynamic selection of young underperforming plants. As a consequence, the size distribution of non-micro plants exhibits more concentration in small-old plants in Colombia, both in unweighted and employment-weighted bases. These findings point to a shortage of high-growth entrepreneurship and a relatively high likelihood of long-run survival for small, likely unproductive plants, as two key elements at the heart of the development problem. An extreme concentration of resources in micro plants is the other distinguishing feature of the Colombian manufacturing sector vis a vis the US.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w25550

 
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