NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
loading...

Do Star Performers Produce More Stars? Peer Effects and Learning in Elite Teams

Casey Ichniowski, Anne Preston

NBER Working Paper No. 20478
Issued in September 2014
NBER Program(s):Labor Studies Program

This study investigates the professional soccer industry to ask whether the talent of an individual's co-workers helps explain differences in the rate of human capital accumulation on the job. Data tracking national soccer team performance and the professional leagues their members play for are particularly well suited for developing convincing non-experimental evidence about these kinds of peer effects. The empirical results consistently show that performance improves more after an individual has been a member of an elite team than when he has been a member of lower level teams. The conclusion is borne out by a rich set of complementary data on: national team performance, player-level performance, performance of foreign players who joined elite teams after an exogenous shift in the number of foreign players participating on top club teams, performance of players on national teams in the year just before and the year just after they join an elite club team, and experiences of several national team players obtained through personal interviews.

download in pdf format
   (340 K)

email paper

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w20478

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded* these:
Davis and Haltiwanger w20479 Labor Market Fluidity and Economic Performance
Angrist w19774 The Perils of Peer Effects
Card and Giuliano w20453 Does Gifted Education Work? For Which Students?
Ichniowski and Preston w17928 Does March Madness Lead to Irrational Exuberance in the NBA Draft? High-Value Employee Selection Decisions and Decision-Making Bias
Halonen-Akatwijuka and Hart w21005 Short-term, Long-term, and Continuing Contracts
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Themes
Data
People
About

National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us