NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
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Long-term and Intergenerational Effects of Education: Evidence from School Construction in Indonesia

Richard Akresh, Daniel Halim, Marieke Kleemans

NBER Working Paper No. 25265
Issued in November 2018, Revised in November 2018
NBER Program(s):Children, Development Economics, Economics of Education, Health Economics, Labor Studies, Public Economics

In 1973, the Indonesian government began one of the largest school construction programs ever. We use 2016 nationally representative data to examine the long-term and intergenerational effects of additional schooling as a child. We use a difference-in-differences identification strategy exploiting variation across birth cohorts and regions in the number of schools built. Men and women exposed to the program attain more education, although women’s effects are concentrated in primary school. As adults, men exposed to the program are more likely to be formal workers, work outside agriculture, and migrate. Households with parents exposed to the program have improved living standards and pay more government taxes. Education benefits are transmitted to the next generation. Increased parental education has larger impacts for daughters, particularly if mothers are exposed to school construction. Intergenerational results are driven by changes in the marriage partner’s characteristics, with spouses having more education and improved labor market outcomes.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w25265

 
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