NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
loading...

Israel's Immigration Story: Winners and Losers

Assaf Razin

NBER Working Paper No. 24283
Issued in February 2018
NBER Program(s):International Finance and Macroeconomics Program

The exodus of Soviet Jews to Israel in the 1990s was a unique event. The immigration wave was distinctive for its large high skilled cohort, and its quick integration into the domestic labor market. Immigration also changed the entire economic landscape: it raised productivity, underpinned by the information technological surge, and had significant impact on income inequality. The extraordinary experience of Israel, which has received three quarter million migrants from the Former Soviet Union within a short time, is also relevant for the current debate about winners and losers from immigration. This paper provides a rigorous explanation for a possible link between the immigration wave and the changed level of redistribution in Israel’s welfare state.

download in pdf format
   (477 K)

email paper

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w24283

Published: Assaf Razin, 2018. "ISRAEL’s IMMIGRATION STORY: WINNERS AND LOSERS," Israel Economic Review, Bank of Israel, vol. 15(1), pages 73-106. citation courtesy of

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded* these:
Gu and Prasad w24266 New Evidence on Cyclical Variation in Labor Costs in the U.S.
Parker and Vogl w24303 Do Conditional Cash Transfers Improve Economic Outcomes in the Next Generation? Evidence from Mexico
Milgrom and Tadelis w24282 How Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning Can Impact Market Design
Jaeger, Ruist, and Stuhler w24285 Shift-Share Instruments and the Impact of Immigration
Eggertsson, Juelsrud, and Wold w24039 Are Negative Nominal Interest Rates Expansionary?
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Themes
Data
People
About

National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us