NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
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Why is Pollution from U.S. Manufacturing Declining? The Roles of Environmental Regulation, Productivity, and Trade

Joseph S. Shapiro, Reed Walker

NBER Working Paper No. 20879
Issued in January 2015, Revised in June 2018

---- Acknowledgments ----

Previously circulated as "Why is Pollution from U.S. Manufacturing Declining? The Roles of Trade, Regulation, Productivity, and Preferences." We thank Joe Altonji, Costas Arkolakis, Randy Becker, Jared Carbone, Brian Copeland, Arnaud Costinot, John Deutch, Sharat Ganapati, Michael Greenstone, Sam Kortum, Arik Levinson, Bill Nordhaus, Noam Yuchtman, and numerous seminar participants for useful comments and discussions. We also thank Elyse Adamic, Adrian Fernandez, Vivek Sampathkumar, David Silver, and Yusuf Mercan for excellent research assistance. The authors acknowledge support from NSF Grant SES-1530494 and a joint grant from the Department of Energy, the Sloan Foundation, and the National Bureau of Economic Research on the Economics of Energy Markets, Shapiro acknowledges additional support from the Yale MacMillan Center, the Yale Program on Applied Economics and Policy Research, and a Weyerhaeuser Research Grant from the Yale Center for Business and the Environment, and Walker acknowledges additional support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the UC Office of the President through the University of California Center for Energy and Environmental Economics. All results have been reviewed by the U.S. Census Bureau to ensure that no confidential information is disclosed. The authors declare that they have no relevant or material financial interests that relate to the research described in this paper. The views expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Bureau of Economic Research.

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