NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
loading...

Education, HIV, and Early Fertility: Experimental Evidence from Kenya

Esther Duflo, Pascaline Dupas, Michael Kremer

NBER Working Paper No. 20784
Issued in December 2014
NBER Program(s):Program on Children, Development Economics Program, Economics of Education Program

A seven-year randomized evaluation suggests education subsidies reduce adolescent girls' dropout, pregnancy, and marriage but not sexually transmitted infection (STI). The government's HIV curriculum, which stresses abstinence until marriage, does not reduce pregnancy or STI. Both programs combined reduce STI more, but cut dropout and pregnancy less, than education subsidies alone. These results are inconsistent with a model of schooling and sexual behavior in which both pregnancy and STI are determined by one factor (unprotected sex), but consistent with a two-factor model in which choices between committed and casual relationships also affect these outcomes.

download in pdf format
   (1093 K)

email paper

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w20784

Published: Esther Duflo & Pascaline Dupas & Michael Kremer, 2015. "Education, HIV, and Early Fertility: Experimental Evidence from Kenya," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 105(9), pages 2757-97, September. citation courtesy of

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded* these:
Friedman, Kremer, Miguel, and Thornton w16939 Education as Liberation?
Sloan, Robinson, and Eldred w20679 Does Private Information Influence Automobile Insurance Purchase Decisions?
Michalopoulos and Papaioannou w20513 On the Ethnic Origins of African Development Chiefs and Pre-colonial Political Centralization
Kerr and Nanda w20676 Financing Innovation
Barseghyan, Clark, and Coate w20701 Public School Choice: An Economic Analysis
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Themes
Data
People
About

National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us