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Workers' Employment Rates and Pension Reforms in France: The Role of Implicit Labor Taxation

Didier Blanchet, Antoine Bozio, Simon Rabaté, Muriel Roger


This chapter is a preliminary draft unless otherwise noted. It may not have been subjected to the formal review process of the NBER. This page will be updated as the chapter is revised.

Chapter in forthcoming NBER book Social Security Programs and Retirement around the World: Reforms and Retirement Incentives, Axel Börsch-Supan and Courtney Coile, editors
Forthcoming from University of Chicago Press
in NBER Book Series - International Social Security

Over the last fifteen years, France has experienced a reversal of older workers’ labor force participation and employment rates. Changes in health, life expectancy or education levels over the period are trend variables and thus cannot explain this “U-shaped” time profile. Pension reforms and associated changes in monetary incentives to retire are a more plausible explanation. Their impact is measured by the implicit tax rate on working longer, which combines induced changes in the level of benefits and the fact of foregoing one year of these benefits. We also account for changes in the relative importance of alternative pathways to normal retirement. Pension reforms and access to these alternative pathways have moved in ways that can account for a significant part of the “U-shaped” pattern of older workers labor force participation.

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This chapter first appeared as NBER working paper w25733, Workers' Employment Rates and Pension Reforms in France: the Role of Implicit Labor Taxation, Didier Blanchet, Antoine Bozio, Simon Rabaté, Muriel Roger
 
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