NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
loading...

The Challenge to U.S. Leadership in High-Technology Industries (Can the United States Maintain Its Lead? Should It Try?)

Rachel McCulloch

NBER Working Paper No. 2513
Issued in February 1988
NBER Program(s):International Trade and Investment Program, International Finance and Macroeconomics Program

The United States emerged from World War II as the acknowledged global leader in basic science and its industrial application. While U.S. science has been able to maintain that preeminence in most areas, the nation's technological lead has met increasingly formidable challenges from abroad. Although the evidence on recent U.S. performance is mixed, other nations, and especially Japan, have clearly gained ground in high-technology production and trade. The future of U.S. high-technology production has thus emerged as a major focus of public policy. This paper reviews the recent performance of U.S. high-techology industries, examines possible motives underlying government policies to promote high-technology production, and offers some guidelines for evaluating the outcomes of alternative policy regimes.

download in pdf format
   (277 K)

download in djvu format
   (204 K)

email paper

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w2513

Published: Technological competition and Interdependence: Japan, West Germany and the United States in Search of Policy for the Twenty-first Century" , Seattle: University of Washington Press, ed. Gunter Heiduk and Kozo Yamamura, 1990, pp. 192-211.

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded* these:
Bregman, Fuss, and Regev w2969 High Tech Firms in Israeli Industry
Fabricant Time Allocation of Capital Consumption
Abowd and Tracy w2595 Market Structure, Strike Activity, and Union Wage Settlements
Hines w10936 Do Tax Havens Flourish?
Korajczyk, Lucas, and McDonald w3170 Understanding Stock Price Behavior around the Time of Equity Issues
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Themes
Data
People
About

National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us