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The Impact of International Patent Systems: Evidence from Accession to the European Patent Convention

Bronwyn Hall, Christian Helmers

NBER Working Paper No. 24207
Issued in January 2018
NBER Program(s):International Trade and Investment, Productivity, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship

We analyze the impact of accession to the regional patent system established by the European Patent Convention (EPC) on 14 countries that acceded between 2000 and 2008. We look at changes in patenting behavior by domestic and foreign applicants at the national patent offices and the European Patent Office (EPO). Our findings suggest a strong change in patent filing behavior among foreigners seeking patent protection in the accession states, substituting EPO patents for domestic patents immediately. However, there is little evidence that accession increased FDI by patenting foreign companies in accession countries. Moreover, there is no discernible reaction among domestic entities in terms of domestic filings, although we do find some evidence that applicants in accession states increased their propensity to file patents with the EPO post-accession. Inventor-level information suggests that the underlying inventions originate in the accession states

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w24207

Published: Bronwyn H. Hall & Christian Helmers, 2019. "The impact of international patent systems: Evidence from accession to the European Patent Convention," Research Policy, vol 48(9).

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