NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
loading...

Education Research and Administrative Data

David N. Figlio, Krzysztof Karbownik, Kjell G. Salvanes

NBER Working Paper No. 21592
Issued in September 2015
NBER Program(s):The Program on Children, The Education Program

Thanks to extraordinary and exponential improvements in data storage and computing capacities, it is now possible to collect, manage, and analyze data in magnitudes and in manners that would have been inconceivable just a short time ago. As the world has developed this remarkable capacity to store and analyze data, so have the world’s governments developed large-scale, comprehensive data files on tax programs, workforce information, benefit programs, health, and education. While these data are collected for purely administrative purposes, they represent remarkable new opportunities for expanding our knowledge. This chapter describes some of the benefits and challenges associated with the use of administrative data in education research. We also offer specific case studies of data that have been developed in both the Nordic countries and the United States, and offer an (incomplete) inventory of data sets used by social scientists to study education questions on every inhabited continent on earth.

download in pdf format
   (506 K)

email paper

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w21592

Published: D. Figlio, K. Karbownik, K.G. Salvanes, Chapter 2 - Education Research and Administrative Data, Editor(s): Eric A. Hanushek, Stephen Machin, Ludger Woessmann, Handbook of the Economics of Education, Elsevier, Volume 5, 2016, Pages 75-138, ISSN 1574-0692, ISBN 9780444634597, https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-444-63459-7.00002-6.

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded* these:
Meyer and Mittag w21676 Using Linked Survey and Administrative Data to Better Measure Income: Implications for Poverty, Program Effectiveness and Holes in the Safety Net
Autor, Figlio, Karbownik, Roth, and Wasserman w21908 School Quality and the Gender Gap in Educational Achievement
Lavecchia, Liu, and Oreopoulos w20609 Behavioral Economics of Education: Progress and Possibilities
Page and Scott-Clayton w21781 Improving College Access in the United States: Barriers and Policy Responses
Goetz, Hyatt, McEntarfer, and Sandusky w21639 The Promise and Potential of Linked Employer-Employee Data for Entrepreneurship Research
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Themes
Data
People
About

National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us