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About the Author(s)

lanjouw

Jean O. Lanjouw is a Faculty Research Fellow in the NBER=s Program on Productivity. She is also a Senior Fellow in Economic Studies and Governance Studies at the Brookings Institution, a Senior Fellow at the Center for Global Development, Washington, DC, and an Associate Professor of Economics in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, University of California at Berkeley.

Lanjouw obtained her A.B. in Mathematics and Economics from Miami University and her M.Sc. and Ph.D. in Economics from the London School of Economics, UK. Her current projects focus on domestic and international property rights issues. Her research has been published in a wide variety of academic journals including the Review of Economic Studies, Econometrica, the Journal of Development Economics, and the Journal of Industrial Economics. She also has organized several conferences on patent reform and statistics and has consulted for the World Bank, the UNDP, and statistical organizations in South Africa and Brazil.

She and her husband, Peter Lanjouw, currently reside in Washington, D.C. with their two children, Max and Else.

Endnotes

1. A. B. Jaffe, "The U.S. Patent System in Transition: Policy Innovation and the Innovative Process," NBER Working Paper 7280, August 1999, and in Research Policy, 2000.   Go to ⤴︎
2. J. O. Lanjouw and J. Lerner, "The Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights: A Survey of the Empirical Literature," NBER Working Paper 6296, December 1997, and in the Annales d'Economie et de Statistique, (49/50) (July 1998), pp. 223-46. Go to ⤴︎
3. More recent work involving NBER researchers includes, for example, Graham et al, 2002, and Hall and Ziedonis, 2001. See S. J. H. Graham, B. H. Hall, D. Harhoff, and D. C. Mowery, "Patent Quality Control: A Comparison of U.S. Patent Re-examinations and European Patent Opposition," NBER Working Paper 8807, February 2002; and B. H. Hall and R. H. Ziedonis, "The Patent Paradox Revisited: An Empirical Study of Patenting in the Semiconductor Industry, 1979-1999," NBER Working Paper 7062, March 1999, and in RAND Journal of Economics, (32) (1) (2001), pp. 101-28. Go to ⤴︎
4. J. O. Lanjouw and M. Schankerman, "An Empirical Analysis of the Enforcement of Patent Rights in the United States," in W. M. Cohen and S. Merrill, eds., Patents in the Knowledge-Based Economy, Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press, 2003; J. O. Lanjouw and M. Schankerman, "Enforcing Intellectual Property," NBER Working Paper 8656, December 2001; and J. O. Lanjouw and M. Schankerman, "Characteristics of Patent Litigation: A Window on Competition," NBER Working Paper 6297, December 1997, and in The Rand Journal of Economics, (32) (1) (2001), pp. 129-51.   Go to ⤴︎
5. See J. O. Lanjouw and M. Schankerman, "An Empirical Analysis of the Enforcement of Patent Rights in the United States." Go to ⤴︎
6. J. O. Lanjouw and J. Lerner, "Tilting the Table? The Predatory Use of Preliminary Injunctions, " NBER Working Paper 5689, July 1996, and in The Journal of Law and Economics, (XLIV) (2) (2001), pp. 573-603. Go to ⤴︎
7. See J. O. Lanjouw and J. Lerner, "The Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights: A Survey of the Empirical Literature." Go to ⤴︎
8. See also J. O. Lanjouw and M. Schankerman, "An Empirical Analysis of the Enforcement of Patent Rights in the United States." Go to ⤴︎
9. J. O. Lanjouw, "Patent Protection in the Shadow of Infringement: Simulation Estimations of Patent Value," NBER Working Paper 4475, September 1993, and in The Review of Economic Studies, (65) (1998), pp. 671-710.   Go to ⤴︎
10. J. O. Lanjouw, "Beyond Lawyers' Fees: Economic Consequences of a Changing Litigation Environment," NBER Working Paper 4835, August 1994. Revised version available. See also J. O. Lanjouw, A. Pakes, and J. Putnam, "How to Count Patents and Value Intellectual Property: Uses of Patent Renewal and Application Data," NBER Working Paper 5741, September 1996, and in The Journal of Industrial Economics, (XLVI) (4) (December 1998), pp. 405-33. Go to ⤴︎
11. J. O. Lanjouw, "The Introduction of Product Patents in India: 'Heartless Exploitation of the Poor and Suffering'?" NBER Working Paper 6366, January 1998. Go to ⤴︎
12. J. O. Lanjouw and I. Cockburn, "New Pills for Poor People? Empirical Evidence After GATT," NBER Working Paper 7495, January 2000, and in World Development, (29) (2) (2001), pp. 265-89. Go to ⤴︎
13. J. O. Lanjouw and A. Mody, "Innovation and the International Diffusion of Environmentally Responsive Technology," Research Policy, (25) (1996), pp. 549-71. Go to ⤴︎
14. J. O. Lanjouw, "Beyond TRIPS: A New Global Patent Regime," Policy Brief No. 3, The Center for Global Development, July 2002, at http://www.cgdev.org/fellows/lanjouw.html ; J. O. Lanjouw, "A Patent Policy for Global Diseases: U.S. and International Legal Issues," Harvard Journal of Law & Technology, (16) (1) (Fall 2002); J. O. Lanjouw, "A Patent Proposal for Global Diseases," Policy Brief No. 84, The Brookings Institution, June 2001; and J. O. Lanjouw, "Intellectual Property and the Availability of Pharmaceuticals in Poor Countries," Center for Global Development Working Paper No. 5, April 2002, and forthcoming in Innovation Policy and the Economy, (3).   Go to ⤴︎
15. EXTRA: J. O. Lanjouw, A. Pakes, and J. Putnam, "How to Count Patents and Value Intellectual Property: Uses of Patent Renewal and Application Data," NBER Working Paper 5741, September 1996, and in The Journal of Industrial Economics, (XLVI) (4) (December 1998), pp. 405-33. Go to ⤴︎

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