NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
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Felipe González

Instituto de Economía
Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile
Santiago de Chile

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Institutional Affiliation: University of California at Berekeley

NBER Working Papers and Publications

August 2018Economic and Non-Economic Factors in Violence: Evidence from Organized Crime, Suicides and Climate in Mexico
with Ceren Baysan, Marshall Burke, Solomon Hsiang, Edward Miguel: w24897
Organized intergroup violence is almost universally modeled as a calculated act motivated by economic factors. In contrast, it is generally assumed that non-economic factors, such as an individual's emotional state, play a role in many types of interpersonal violence, such as "crimes of passion." We ask whether economic or non-economic factors better explain the well-established relationship between temperature and violence in a unique context where intergroup killings by drug-trafficking organizations (DTOs) and "normal" interpersonal homicides are separately documented. A constellation of evidence, including the limited influence of a cash transfer program as well as comparison with both non-violent DTO crime and suicides, indicate that economic factors only partially explain the observe...
August 2016Start-up Nation? Slave Wealth and Entrepreneurship in Civil War Maryland
with Guillermo Marshall, Suresh Naidu: w22483
Slave property rights yielded a source of collateral as well as a coerced labor force. Using data from Dun and Bradstreet linked to the 1860 census and slave schedules in Maryland, we find that slaveowners were more likely to start businesses prior to the uncompensated 1864 emancipation, even conditional on total wealth and human capital, and this advantage disappears after emancipation. We assess a number of potential explanations, and find suggestive evidence that this is due to the superiority of slave wealth as a source of collateral for credit rather than any advantage in production. The collateral dimension of slave property magnifies its importance to historical American economic development.

Published: Felipe González & Guillermo Marshall & Suresh Naidu, 2017. "Start-up Nation? Slave Wealth and Entrepreneurship in Civil War Maryland," The Journal of Economic History, vol 77(02), pages 373-405. citation courtesy of

 
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