NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
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Daniela Del Boca

Department of Economics and Statistics
University of Turin and
Collegio Carlo Alberto
Lungo Dora Siena 100 A
10153 Turin
Italy

E-Mail: EmailAddress: hidden: you can email any NBER-related person as first underscore last at nber dot org
Institutional Affiliation: University of Turin

NBER Working Papers and Publications

February 2019Actors in the Child Development Process
with Christopher J. Flinn, Ewout Verriest, Matthew J. Wiswall: w25596
We construct and estimate a model of child development in which both the parents and children make investments in the child’s skill development. In each period of the development process, partially altruistic parents act as the Stackelberg leader and the child the follower when setting her own study time. We then extend this non-cooperative form of interaction by allowing parents to offer incentives to the child to increase her study time, at some monitoring cost. We show that this incentive scheme, a kind of internal conditional cash transfer, produces efficient outcomes and, in general, increases the child’s cognitive ability. In addition to heterogeneity in resources (wage offers and non-labor income), the model allows for heterogeneity in preferences both for parents and children, and ...
May 2017Evaluation of the Reggio Approach to Early Education
with Pietro Biroli, James J. Heckman, Lynne Pettler Heckman, Yu Kyung. Koh, Sylvi Kuperman, Sidharth Moktan, Chiara D. Pronzato, Anna Ziff: w23390
We evaluate the Reggio Approach using non-experimental data on individuals from the cities of Reggio Emilia, Parma and Padova belonging to one of five age cohorts: ages 50, 40, 30, 18, and 6 as of 2012. The treated were exposed to municipally offered infant-toddler (ages 0-3) and preschool (ages 3-6) programs. The control group either did not receive formal childcare or were exposed to programs offered by the state or religious systems. We exploit the city-cohort structure of the data to estimate treatment effects using three strategies: difference-in-differences, matching, and matched-difference-in-differences. Most positive and significant effects are generated from comparisons of the treated with individuals who did not receive formal childcare. Relative to not receiving formal care, t...

Published: Pietro Biroli & Daniela Del Boca & James J. Heckman & Lynne Pettler Heckman & Yu Kyung Koh & Sylvi Kuperman & Sidharth Moktan & Chiara D. Pronzato & Anna L. Ziff, 2018. "Evaluation of the Reggio approach to early education," Research in Economics, vol 72(1), pages 1-32. citation courtesy of

 
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