NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
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Benjamin L. Castleman

University of Virginia
Curry School of Education
405 Emmett Street South
P.O. Box 400277
Charlottesville, VA 22902
Tel: 434-243-5419

E-Mail: EmailAddress: hidden: you can email any NBER-related person as first underscore last at nber dot org
Institutional Affiliation: University of Virginia

NBER Working Papers and Publications

August 2019Nudging at Scale: Experimental Evidence from FAFSA Completion Campaigns
with Kelli A. Bird, Jeffrey T. Denning, Joshua Goodman, Cait Lamberton, Kelly Ochs Rosinger: w26158
Do nudge interventions that have generated positive impacts at a local level maintain efficacy when scaled state or nationwide? What specific mechanisms explain the positive impacts of promising smaller-scale nudges? We investigate, through two randomized controlled trials, the impact of a national and state-level campaign to encourage students to apply for financial aid for college. The campaigns collectively reached over 800,000 students, with multiple treatment arms to investigate different potential mechanisms. We find no impacts on financial aid receipt or college enrollment overall or for any student subgroups. We find no evidence that different approaches to message framing, delivery, or timing, or access to one-on-one advising affected campaign efficacy. We discuss why nudge strate...
August 2013Looking Beyond Enrollment: The Causal Effect of Need-Based Grants on College Access, Persistence, and Graduation
with Bridget Terry Long: w19306
The government has attempted to ameliorate gaps in college access and success by providing need-based grants, but little evidence exists on the long-term impacts of such aid. We examine the effects of the Florida Student Access Grant (FSAG) using a regression-discontinuity strategy and exploiting the cut-off used to determine eligibility. We find grant eligibility had a positive effect on attendance, particularly at public four-year institutions. Moreover, FSAG increased the rate of credit accumulation and bachelor’s degree completion within six years, with a 22 percent increase for students near the eligibility cutoff. The effects are robust to sensitivity analysis.

Forthcoming in the Journal of Labor Economics citation courtesy of

 
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