NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

The NBER Reporter Spring 2004: Books

The following volumes may be ordered directly from

University of Chicago Press,
Order Department,
11030 South Langley Avenue,
Chicago, IL 60628-2215;
(800) 621 2736.

Academic discounts of 10 percent for individual volumes and 20 percent for standing orders for all NBER books published by the University of Chicago Press are also available to univerity faculty; orders must be sent on university stationary

Seeking a Premier Economy: The Economic Effects of British Economic Reforms, 1980-2000

Seeking a Premier Economy: The Economic Effects of British Economic Reforms, 1980-2000, edited by David Card, Richard Blundell, and Richard B. Freeman, will be available from the University of Chicago Press this spring. Part of the Comparative Labor Markets Series, the book is priced at $95.00.

In the 1980s and 1990s, successive U.K. governments enacted a series of reforms to establish a more market-oriented economy, closer to the American model and further away from its Western European competitors. Today, the United Kingdom is one of the least regulated economies in the world, marked by transformed welfare and industrial relations systems and broad privatization. Virtually every industry and government program has been affected by the reforms, from hospitals and schools to labor unions and jobless benefit programs.

This volume focuses on the labor and product market reforms that directly affected productivity, employment, and inequality. Its authors ask: How did the United Kingdom manage to stave off falling earnings for lower paid workers? What role did the reforms play in rising income inequality and trends in poverty? At the same time, what reforms contributed to reduced unemployment and the accelerated growth of real wages?

Card is an NBER Research Associate and the Class of 1950 Professor of economics at the University of California, Berkeley. Blundell is a Professor of Economcis at University College London and Director of Research at the Institute for Fiscal Studies. Freeman directs the NBER's Program on Labor Studies and is the Herbert Ascherman Professor of Economics at Harvard University.

Growth and Productivity in East Asia

Growth and Productivity in East Asia, edited by Takatoshi Ito and Andrew K. Rose, will be available soon from the University of Chicago Press. This is the thirteenth conference volume resulting from the NBER's East Asia Seminar on Economics. It is priced at $85.00.

Considering the examples of Australia and the Pacific Rim, the book offers a contemporary explanation for national productivity that measures contributions not only from capital and labor, but also from economic activities and relevant changes in policy, education, and technology. For this conference, Ito and Rose organized a group of collaborators from several Asian countries, the United States, and other parts of the globe who ably balance both macroeconomic and microeconomic study with theoretical and empirical approaches. The resulting volume pays special attention to the causes for the unusual success of Australia, one of the few nations to maintain unprecedented economic growth despite the 1997 Asian financial crisis and the 2001 global downturn. A new database comprising 84 Japanese sectors reveals findings for the last 30 years of sectoral productivity and growth in Japan. Papers focusing on Indonesia, Taiwan, and Korea also consider productivity and its relationship to research and development, foreign ownership, and policy reform in such industries as manufacturing, automobile production, and information technology.

Ito and Rose are Research Associates in the NBER's Program on International Trade and Investment. Ito is also a professor at the University of Tokyo. Rose is the B.T. Rocca Professor of Economic Analysis and Policy at the Haas School of Business at the University of California, Berkeley.

 
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