NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Changes in Workplace Segregation in the United States between 1990 and 2000: Evidence from Matched Employer-Employee Data

Judith Hellerstein, David Neumark, Melissa McInerney

NBER Working Paper No. 13080
Issued in May 2007
NBER Program(s):   LS

We present evidence on changes in workplace segregation by education, race, ethnicity, and sex, from 1990 to 2000. The evidence indicates that racial and ethnic segregation at the workplace level remained quite pervasive in 2000. At the same time, there was fairly substantial segregation by skill, as measured by education. Putting together the 1990 and 2000 data, we find no evidence of declines in workplace segregation by race and ethnicity; indeed, black-white segregation increased. Over this decade, segregation by education also increased. In contrast, workplace segregation by sex fell over the decade, and would have fallen by more had the services industry - a heavily female industry in which sex segregation is relatively high - not experienced rapid employment growth.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w13080

Published: Changes in Workplace Segregation in the United States between 1990 and 2000: Evidence from Matched Employer-Employee Data, Judith Hellerstein, David Neumark, Melissa McInerney. in The Analysis of Firms and Employees: Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches, Bender, Lane, Shaw, Andersson, and von Wachter. 2008

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