NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Economic Conditions and Children's Mental Health

Ezra Golberstein, Gilbert Gonzales, Ellen Meara

NBER Working Paper No. 22459
Issued in July 2016
NBER Program(s):CH, HC, HE

Research linking economic conditions and health largely ignores children’s mental health problems, which are the most common and consequential health issues for children and adolescents. We examine the effects of unemployment rates and housing prices on child and adolescent mental health and use of special education services for emotional problems in the 2001-2013 National Health Interview Survey. Mental health status declines as economic conditions deteriorate, and this result is pervasive across nearly every subgroup we examine, including families least likely to experience job loss. The use of special education services for emotional problems also rises when economic conditions worsen.

download in pdf format
   (338 K)

email paper

The NBER Bulletin on Aging and Health provides summaries of publications like this.  You can sign up to receive the NBER Bulletin on Aging and Health by email.

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w22459

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded* these:
Landersø and Heckman w22465 The Scandinavian Fantasy: The Sources of Intergenerational Mobility in Denmark and the U.S.
Levy, Norton, and Smith w22471 Tobacco Regulation and Cost-Benefit Analysis: How Should We Value Foregone Consumer Surplus?
Molitor w22478 The Evolution of Physician Practice Styles: Evidence from Cardiologist Migration
Oster w22464 Does Disease Cause Vaccination? Disease Outbreaks and Vaccination Response
Costa, Kahn, Roudiez, and Wilson w22397 Persistent Social Networks: Civil War Veterans who Fought Together Co-Locate in Later Life
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Themes
Data
People
About

National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us