NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Shared Modes of Compensation and Firm Performance: UK Evidence

Martin J. Conyon, Richard B. Freeman

NBER Working Paper No. 8448
Issued in August 2001
NBER Program(s):   LS

This paper examines the use and consequences of shared compensation plans (profit sharing, profit related pay, SAYE schemes and company stock option plans) in a sample of UK workplaces and firms in the 1990s. The use of these plans has increased over time, in part in response to government programs. The evidence shows that companies and workplaces adopting shared compensation practices have had higher productivity than other firms, but the effects vary among programs, suggesting that the particulars matter a lot in aligning shared compensation and work place activities. Consistent with incentive theory, the evidence also shows that firms and workplaces with shared compensation practices have a higher incidence of shared decision-making / information sharing practices.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w8448

Published: Shared Modes of Compensation and Firm Performance U.K. Evidence, Martin Conyon, Richard B. Freeman. in Seeking a Premier Economy: The Economic Effects of British Economic Reforms, 1980-2000, Card, Blundell, and Freeman. 2004

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