NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Determinants of Young Male Schooling and Training Choices

Stephen V. Cameron, James J. Heckman

NBER Working Paper No. 4327
Issued in April 1993
NBER Program(s):   LS

This paper examines the determinants of GED acquisition. high school graduation and postsecondary training and schooling choices. Economic factors determining dropping out are considered. The determinants of high school certification by exam are fundamentally different from the determinants of ordinary high school graduation. GED graduates are more likely to take vocational and technical training while ordinary graduates are more likely to attend academic programs. GED recipients are much less likely to complete the post-secondary programs they begin. The GED exam does not measure the ability or motivation that predicts successful completion of post-secondary schooling and training programs. Participation in post-secondary nonacademic training is positively related to family resources. Thus both academic and non-academic training operate to reinforce initial family earnings inequalities.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w4327

Published: Determinants of Young Males’ Schooling and Training Choices, Stephen Cameron, James J. Heckman. in Training and the Private Sector, Lynch. 1994

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