NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Immigration Policy, National Origin, and Immigrant Skills: A Comparison of Canada and the United States

George J. Borjas

NBER Working Paper No. 3691
Issued in April 1991
NBER Program(s):   LS

Over 12 million persons migrated to Canada or the United States between 1959 and 1981. Beginning in the mid?1960s, the immigration policies of the two countries began to diverge considerably: the United States stressing family reunification and Canada stressing skills. This paper shows that the point system used by Canada generated, on average, a more skilled immigrant flow than that which entered the United States. This skill gap, however, is mostly attributable to differences in the national origin mix of the immigrant flows admitted by the two countries. In effect, the point system "works" because it alters the national origin mix of immigrant flows, and not because it generates a more skilled immigrant flow from a given source country.

download in pdf format
   (639 K)

email paper

This paper is available as PDF (639 K) or via email.

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w3691

Published:

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
Bloom, Grenier, and Gunderson w4672 The Changing Labor Market Position of Canadian Immigrants
Borjas Immigration Policy, National Origin, and Immigrant Skills: A Comparison of Canada and the United States
Altonji and Card The Effects of Immigration on the Labor Market Outcomes of Less-skilled Natives
Borjas w2248 Self-Selection and the Earnings of Immigrants
Oreopoulos w15036 Why Do Skilled Immigrants Struggle in the Labor Market? A Field Experiment with Six Thousand Resumes
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us