NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Global Inequality when Unequal Countries Create Unequal People

Martin Ravallion

NBER Working Paper No. 24177
Issued in December 2017
NBER Program(s):Development Economics

Current global inequality measures assume that national-mean income does not matter to economic welfare at given household income, as measured in surveys. The paper questions that assumption on theoretical and empirical grounds and finds that prominent stylized facts about global inequality are not robust. At one extreme, theories of relative deprivation yield a nationalistic measure whereby global inequality is average within-country inequality, which is rising. Other theories and evidence point instead to an intrinsic value to living in a richer country. Then parameter values consistent with subjective wellbeing imply far higher global inequality than prevailing measures, though falling since 1990.

You may purchase this paper on-line in .pdf format from SSRN.com ($5) for electronic delivery.

Access to NBER Papers

You are eligible for a free download if you are a subscriber, a corporate associate of the NBER, a journalist, an employee of the U.S. federal government with a ".GOV" domain name, or a resident of nearly any developing country or transition economy.

If you usually get free papers at work/university but do not at home, you can either connect to your work VPN or proxy (if any) or elect to have a link to the paper emailed to your work email address below. The email address must be connected to a subscribing college, university, or other subscribing institution. Gmail and other free email addresses will not have access.

E-mail:

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w24177

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded* these:
Troiano w24175 Do Taxes Increase Economic Inequality? A Comparative Study Based on the State Personal Income Tax
Korinek and Stiglitz w24174 Artificial Intelligence and Its Implications for Income Distribution and Unemployment
Brown, Ravallion, and van de Walle w24047 Are Poor Individuals Mainly Found in Poor Households? Evidence using Nutrition Data for Africa
Stansbury and Summers w24165 Productivity and Pay: Is the link broken?
Jones, Molitor, and Reif w24229 What Do Workplace Wellness Programs Do? Evidence from the Illinois Workplace Wellness Study
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Themes
Data
People
About

National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us