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The Effect of State Medical Marijuana Laws on Social Security Disability Insurance and Workers' Compensation Claiming

Johanna Catherine Maclean, Keshar M. Ghimire, Lauren Hersch Nicholas

NBER Working Paper No. 23862
Issued in September 2017, Revised in February 2018
NBER Program(s):Aging, Health Economics, Law and Economics, Labor Studies

We study the effect of state medical marijuana laws (MMLs) on Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Workers' Compensation (WC) claiming among working age adults. We use data on bene t claiming drawn from the 1990 to 2013 Current Population Survey coupled with a differences-in-differences design to study this question. We nd that passage of an MML increases SSDI claiming. Post-MML the propensity to claim SSDI increases by 0.31 percentage points, which translates to 11.3% relative to SSDI claiming propensity in our sample (2.7%). Point estimates for WC are imprecise.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w23862

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