NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

High-Skilled Migration and Agglomeration

Sari Pekkala Kerr, William Kerr, Çaǧlar Özden, Christopher Parsons

NBER Working Paper No. 22926
Issued in December 2016
NBER Program(s):   LS   PR

This paper reviews recent research regarding high-skilled migration. We adopt a data-driven perspective, bringing together and describing several ongoing research streams that range from the construction of global migration databases, to the legal codification of national policies regarding high-skilled migration, to the analysis of patent data regarding cross-border inventor movements. A common theme throughout this research is the importance of agglomeration economies for explaining high-skilled migration. We highlight some key recent findings and outline major gaps that we hope will be tackled in the near future.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w22926

Published: Sari Pekkala Kerr & William Kerr & Çağlar Özden & Christopher Parsons, 2017. "High-Skilled Migration and Agglomeration," Annual Review of Economics, vol 9(1), pages 201-234.

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