NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

What Should I Be When I Grow Up? Occupations and Unemployment over the Life Cycle

Martin Gervais, Nir Jaimovich, Henry E. Siu, Yaniv Yedid-Levi

NBER Working Paper No. 20628
Issued in October 2014
NBER Program(s):EFG

Why is unemployment higher for younger individuals? We address this question in a frictional model of the labor market that features learning about occupational fit. In order to learn the occupation in which they are most productive, workers sample occupations over their careers. Because young workers are more likely to be in matches that represent a poor occupational fit, they spend more time in transition between occupations. Through this mechanism, our model can replicate the observed age differences in unemployment which, as in the data, are due to differences in job separation rates.

download in pdf format
   (332 K)

email paper

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w20628

Published: Martin Gervais & Nir Jaimovich & Henry E. Siu & Yaniv Yedid-Levi, 2016. "What Should I Be When I Grow Up? Occupations and Unemployment over the Life Cycle," Journal of Monetary Economics, . citation courtesy of

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded* these:
Gelber, Isen, and Kessler w20810 The Effects of Youth Employment: Evidence from New York City Summer Youth Employment Program Lotteries
Barth, Bryson, Davis, and Freeman w20447 It's Where You Work: Increases in Earnings Dispersion across Establishments and Individuals in the U.S.
Helppie McFall, Murray-Close, Willis, and Chen w20654 Is it all worth it? The experiences of new PhDs on the job market, 2007-2010
Cochrane w20613 Monetary Policy with Interest on Reserves
Saez and Zucman w20625 Wealth Inequality in the United States since 1913: Evidence from Capitalized Income Tax Data
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Themes
Data
People
About

National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us