NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Estimating Habit Formation in Voting

Thomas Fujiwara, Kyle C. Meng, Tom Vogl

NBER Working Paper No. 19721
Issued in December 2013
NBER Program(s):   PE   POL

We estimate habit formation in voting—the effect of past on current turnout—by exploiting transitory voting cost shocks. Using county-level data on U.S. presidential elections from 1952-2012, we find that precipitation on current and past election days reduces voter turnout. Our estimates imply that a 1-point decrease in past turnout lowers current turnout by 0.7-0.9 points. Consistent with a dynamic extension of the Downsian framework, current precipitation has stronger effects following previous rainy elections. Further analyses suggest that this habit formation operates by reinforcing the intrinsic satisfaction associated with voting.

A non-technical summary of this paper is available in the April 2014 NBER digest.  You can sign up to receive the NBER Digest by email.

You may purchase this paper on-line in .pdf format from SSRN.com ($5) for electronic delivery.

Information about Free Papers

You should expect a free download if you are a subscriber, a corporate associate of the NBER, a journalist, an employee of the U.S. federal government with a ".GOV" domain name, or a resident of nearly any developing country or transition economy.

If you usually get free papers at work/university but do not at home, you can either connect to your work VPN or proxy (if any) or elect to have a link to the paper emailed to your work email address below. The email address must be connected to a subscribing college, university, or other subscribing institution. Gmail and other free email addresses will not have access.

E-mail:

Acknowledgments

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w19721

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
Dee and Wyckoff w19529 Incentives, Selection, and Teacher Performance: Evidence from IMPACT
Larrimore, Burkhauser, and Armour w19699 Accounting for Income Changes over the Great Recession (2007-2010) Relative to Previous Recessions: The Importance of Taxes and Transfers
Jackson and Schneider w19645 Reducing Moral Hazard in Employment Relationships: Experimental Evidence on Managerial Control and Performance Pay
Bandiera, Prat, and Sadun w19722 Managing the Family Firm: Evidence from CEOs at Work
Markle and Shackelford w19621 The Impact of Headquarter and Subsidiary Locations on Multinationals’ Effective Tax Rates
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us