NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Credit History: The Changing Nature of Scientific Credit

Joshua S. Gans, Fiona Murray

NBER Working Paper No. 19538
Issued in October 2013
NBER Program(s):   PR

This paper considers the role of the allocation of scientific credit in determining the organization of science. We examine changes in that organization and the nature of credit allocation in the past half century. Our contribution is a formal model of that organizational choice that considers scientist decisions to integrate, collaborate or publish and how credit should be allocated to foster efficient outcomes.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w19538

Forthcoming: Credit History: The Changing Nature of Scientific Credit, Joshua S. Gans, Fiona Murray. in The Changing Frontier: Rethinking Science and Innovation Policy, Jaffe and Jones. 2014

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