NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Earnings Adjustment Frictions: Evidence from the Social Security Earnings Test

Alexander M. Gelber, Damon Jones, Daniel W. Sacks

NBER Working Paper No. 19491
Issued in October 2013

---- Acknowledgements -----

We thank Raj Chetty, Jim Cole, Jim Davis, Mark Duggan, Jonathan Fisher, Richard Freeman, John Friedman, Bill Gale, Hilary Hoynes, Adam Isen, Henrik Kleven, Emmanuel Saez, and numerous seminar participants. We are extremely grateful to David Pattison for generously running the code on the data. We acknowledge financial support from the Wharton Center for Human Resources and the Wharton Risk and Decision Processes Center, from NIH grant #1R03 AG043039-01, from a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, and from support from the U.S. Social Security Administration through grant #5RRC08098400- 05-00 to the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) as part of the SSA Retirement Research Consortium. The findings and conclusions expressed are solely those of the authors and do not represent the views of SSA, any agency of the Federal Government, or the NBER. The research uses data from the Census Bureau's Longitudinal Employer Household Dynamics Program, which was partially supported by the following National Science Foundation Grants: SES-9978093, SES-0339191 and ITR-0427889; National Institute on Aging Grant AG018854; and grants from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. All results have been reviewed to ensure that no confidential information is disclosed. All errors are our own.

---- Disclosure of Financial Relationships for Alexander M. Gelber -----

Disclosure Statement – Alexander Gelber

Alexander Gelber served as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Economic Policy at the U.S. Treasury from June 2012 to June 2013, and he served as Acting Assistant Secretary for Economic Policy and Acting Chief Economist at the U.S. Treasury from April to June 2013. In these capacities, he served as a member of the Social Security Trustees Working Group. In addition to the support for this research acknowledged in the paper, he has received grant support from the University of Pennsylvania and the Social Security Disability Research Consortium for other research.

Funding for this research was received from the National Institutes of Health through grant #1R03 AG043039-01, from support from the U.S. Social Security Administration through grant #5RRC08098400-05-00 to the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) as part of the Social Security Administration Retirement Research Consortium.

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