NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

A Study of the Extent and Potential Causes of Alternative Employment Arrangements

Peter Cappelli, J. R. Keller

NBER Working Paper No. 18376
Issued in September 2012
NBER Program(s):Industrial Organization, Labor Studies

The notion of regular, full-time employment as one of the defining features of the U.S. economy has been called into question in recent years by the apparent growth of alternative or "nonstandard" arrangements - part-time work, temporary help, independent contracting, and other arrangements. Identifying the extent of these arrangements, whether they are increasing, and where they occur is the first step for understanding their implications for the economy and the society. But this has been difficult to do because of the lack of appropriate data. We present estimates of the extent of these practices based on a national probability sample of U.S. establishments, evidence on changes in their use over time, and analyses that help us begin to understand why they are used.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w18376

Published: P. H. Cappelli & J. Keller, 2013. "A Study of the Extent and Potential Causes of Alternative Employment Arrangements," ILR Review, vol 66(4), pages 874-901.

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