NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

School Competition and Teacher Labor Markets: Evidence from Charter School Entry in North Carolina

C. Kirabo Jackson

NBER Working Paper No. 17225
Issued in July 2011
NBER Program(s):   CH   ED   LS   PE

I analyze changes in teacher turnover, hiring, effectiveness, and salaries at traditional public schools after the opening of a nearby charter school. While I find small effects on turnover overall, difficult to staff schools (low-income, high-minority share) hired fewer new teachers and experienced small declines in teacher quality. I also find evidence of a demand side response where schools increased teacher compensation to better retain quality teachers. The results are robust across a variety of alternate specifications to account for non-random charter entry.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w17225

Published: Jackson, C. Kirabo., School competition and teacher labor markets: Evidence from charter school entry in North Carolina, Journal of Public Economics, Volume 96, Issues 5­6, June 2012, Pages 431-448. citation courtesy of

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