NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

The Importance of Segregation, Discrimination, Peer Dynamics, and Identity in Explaining Trends in the Racial Achievement Gap

Roland G. Fryer, Jr

NBER Working Paper No. 16257
Issued in August 2010
NBER Program(s):   LS

After decades of narrowing, the achievement gap between black and white school children widened in the 1990s – a period when the labor market rewards for education were increasing. This presents an important puzzle for economists. In this chapter, I investigate the extent to which economic models of segregation, information-based discrimination, peer dynamics, and identity can explain this puzzle. Under a reasonable set of assumptions, models of peer dynamics and identity are consistent with the time-series data. Segregation and models of discrimination both contradict the trends in important ways.

download in pdf format
   (653 K)

email paper

This paper is available as PDF (653 K) or via email.

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w16257

“The Importance of Segregation, Discrimination, Peer Dynamics, and Identity in Explaining Trends in the Racial Achievement Gap,” [forthcoming in Handbook of Social Economics]

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
Fryer w16256 Racial Inequality in the 21st Century: The Declining Significance of Discrimination
Page, Murnane, and Willett w14213 Trends in the Black-White Achievement Gap:Clarifying the Meaning of Within- and Between-School Achievement Gaps
Dobbie and Fryer w15473 Are High Quality Schools Enough to Close the Achievement Gap? Evidence from a Social Experiment in Harlem
Fryer w15898 Financial Incentives and Student Achievement: Evidence from Randomized Trials
Hanushek and Rivkin w12651 School Quality and the Black-White Achievement Gap
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us