NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Language in Visual Art: The Twentieth Century

David Galenson

NBER Working Paper No. 13845
Issued in March 2008
NBER Program(s):   LS

Words have appeared in visual art since classical times, but until the modern era their use was generally restricted to a few specific functions. In the early twentieth century, the Cubists Braque and Picasso began using words in their paintings and collages in entirely new ways, and their innovation was quickly adopted by other artists. Words, phrases, and sentences were subsequently used by visual artists for a variety of purposes -- to refer to popular culture, to pose verbal puzzles, to engage with philosophy and semiotics, and for political and social commentary. Throughout the century, the use of language in visual art was dominated by conceptual artists, and the increasing role of language over time was symptomatic of the fact that visual art was progressively intended less as an aesthetic product, to be looked at, and increasingly as an intellectual activity, to be read. The prominence of language is yet another way in which the visual art of the twentieth century differs from all earlier periods, as a result of the increasingly extreme practices of conceptual artists after the development of a competitive market for advanced art in the late nineteenth century freed them from the constraints that had previously been imposed by governments and other powerful patrons.

download in pdf format
   (72 K)

email paper

This paper is available as PDF (72 K) or via email.

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w13845

Published: Language in Visual Art, David W. Galenson. in Conceptual Revolutions in Twentieth-Century Art, Galenson. 2009

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
Galenson Language in Visual Art
Galenson w15073 Conceptual Revolutions in Twentieth-Century Art
Galenson w13939 Portraits of the Artist: Personal Visual Art in the Twentieth Century
Galenson w12499 A Conceptual World: Why the Art of the Twentieth Century is So Different From the Art of All Earlier Centuries
Galenson w14066 The Back Story of Twentieth-Century Art
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us