NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

The Risks of Financial Institutions

Mark Carey, Rene M. Stulz

NBER Working Paper No. 11442
Issued in June 2005
NBER Program(s):   AP   CF

Over the last twenty years, the consensus view of systemic risk in the financial system that emerged in response to the banking crises of the 1930s and before has lost much of its relevance. This view held that the main systemic problem is runs on solvent banks leading to bank panics. But financial crises of the last two decades have not fit the mold. A new consensus has yet to emerge, but financial institutions and regulators have considerably broadened their assessment of the risks facing financial institutions. The dramatic rise of modern risk management has changed how the risks of financial institutions are measured and how these institutions are managed. However, modern risk management is not without weaknesses that will have to be addressed.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w11442

Published:

  • Stulz, Rene and Mark Carey (eds.) The Risks of Financial Institutions. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2006.
  • David J. Hand, 2007. "The Risks of Financial Institutions edited by Mark Carey, Rene M. Stulz," International Statistical Review, International Statistical Institute, vol. 75(2), pages 266-267, 08.
  • Introduction to "The Risks of Financial Institutions", Mark Carey, Rene M. Stulz. in The Risks of Financial Institutions, Carey and Stulz. 2006

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