NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

How did Location Affect Adoption of the Commercial Internet? Global Village, Urban Density, and Industry Composition

Chris Forman, Avi Goldfarb, Shane Greenstein

NBER Working Paper No. 9979
Issued in September 2003
NBER Program(s):   IO   PR

The authors test opposing theories on how urban locations influenced the diffusion of Internet technology. They find evidence that, controlling for industry, participation in the Internet is more likely in rural areas than in urban areas. Nevertheless, talk of the dissolution of cities is premature. Frontier Internet technologies appear more often at establishments in urban areas, even with industry controls. Major urban areas also contain many establishments from information technology-intensive industries, whose presence could reinforce the concentration of frontier Internet technologies in these areas. However, information technology-intensive industries are numerous and widespread. Hence, so is the use of frontier technology.

download in pdf format
   (479 K)

email paper

This paper is available as PDF (479 K) or via email.

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w9979

Published: Forman, Chris, Avi Goldfarb and Shane Greenstein. "How Did Location Affect Adoption Of The Commercial Internet? Global Village vs. Urban Leadership," Journal of Urban Economics, 2005, v58(3,Nov), 389-420.

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
Gertler, Gilchrist, and Natalucci w10128 External Constraints on Monetary Policy and the Financial Accelerator
Campa and Goldberg w8934 Exchange Rate Pass-Through into Import Prices: A Macro or Micro Phenomenon?
Comin and Hobijn w12314 An Exploration of Technology Diffusion
Eichengreen and Mody w7458 Would Collective Action Clauses Raise Borrowing Costs?
Bacchetta and van Wincoop w9352 Why Do Consumer Prices React less than Import Prices to Exchange Rates?
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us