NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Procuring Knowledge

Stephen M. Maurer, Suzanne Scotchmer

NBER Working Paper No. 9903
Issued in August 2003
NBER Program(s):   PR

There is growing public interest in alternatives to intellectual property including, but not limited to, prizes and government grants. We argue that there is no single best mechanism for supporting research. Rather, mechanisms can only be compared within specific creative environments. We collect various historical and contemporary examples of alternative incentives, and relate them to models of the creative process. We give an explanation for why federally funded R&D has moved from an intramural activity to largely a grant process. Finally, we observe that much research is supported by a hybrid system of public and private sponsorship, and explain why this makes sense in some circumstances.

download in pdf format
   (374 K)

email paper

This paper is available as PDF (374 K) or via email.

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w9903

Published: Libecap, Gary (ed.) Intellectual Property and Entrepreneurship, Volume 15. JAI Press, 2004.

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
Bergmann A Microsimulation of the Macroeconomy with Explicitly Represented Money Flows
Gali and Gertler w13542 Macroeconomic Modeling for Monetary Policy Evaluation
Korenman and Neumark w6031 Cohort Crowding and Youth Labor Markets: A Cross-National Analysis
Anderson and Meyer w5201 The Incidence of a Firm-Varying Payroll Tax: The Case of Unemployment Insurance
Jian, Sachs, and Warner w5412 Trends in Regional Inequality in China
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us