NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Trade Reforms, Labor Regulations and Labor-Demand Elasticities: Empirical Evidence from India

Rana Hasan, Devashish Mitra, K.V. Ramaswamy

NBER Working Paper No. 9879
Issued in August 2003
NBER Program(s):   ITI   LS

Using industry-level data disaggregated by states, this paper finds a positive impact of trade liberalization on labor-demand elasticities in the Indian manufacturing sector. These elasticities turn out to be negatively related to protection levels that vary across industries and over time. Furthermore, we find that these elasticities are not only higher for Indian states with more flexible labor regulations, they are also impacted to a larger degree by trade reforms. Finally, we find that after the reforms, volatility in productivity and output gets translated into larger wage and employment volatility, theoretically a possible consequence of larger labor-demand elasticities.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w9879

Published: Rana Hasan & Devashish Mitra & K.V Ramaswamy, 2007. "Trade Reforms, Labor Regulations, and Labor-Demand Elasticities: Empirical Evidence from India," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 89(3), pages 466-481, 02.

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