NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Time Vs. Goods: The Value of Measuring Household Production Technologies

Reuben Gronau, Daniel S. Hamermesh

NBER Working Paper No. 9650
Issued in April 2003
NBER Program(s):   LS

We take U.S. and Israeli household data on expenditures of time and goods, generate an exhaustive set of commodities that households produce/consume using them, and calculate their relative goods intensities. Leisure activities are uniformly relatively time intensive, health, travel and lodging relatively goods intensive. We demonstrate how education and age alter the goods intensity of household production. The results of this accounting can be used as guides to: Understanding how goods and income taxation interact to affect welfare; expanding notions of the determinants of international flows of goods; generating models of business cycles and endogenous growth to include interactions of goods and time consumption; and obtaining better measures of the distribution of well being.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w9650

Published: "Time vs. Goods: The Value of Measuring Household Production Technologies" Gronau, Reuben; Hamermesh, Daniel S.; Review of Income and Wealth, March 2006, v. 52, iss. 1, pp. 1-16

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