NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Hog Round Marketing, Seed Quality, and Government Policy: Institutional Change in U.S. Cotton Production, 1920-1960

Alan L. Olmstead, Paul W. Rhode

NBER Working Paper No. 9612
Issued in April 2003
NBER Program(s):   DAE

Between 1928 and 1960 U.S. cotton production witnessed a revolution with average yields roughly tripling while the quality of the crop increased significantly. This paper analyzes the key institutional and scientific developments that facilitated the revolution in biological technologies, pointing to the importance of two government programs -- the one-variety community movement and the Smith-Doxey Act -- as catalysts for change. The story displays two phenomena of interest in light of the recent literature: 1. an important real-world example of the workings of Akerlof's lemons model and 2. a case where inventors, during an early phase of the product cycle, actually encouraged consumers to copy and disseminate their intellectual property.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w9612

Published: Olmstead, Alan L. and Paul W. Rhode. "Hog-Round Marketing, Seed Quality, And Government Policy: Institutional Change In U.S. Cotton Production, 1920-1960," Journal of Economic History, 2003, v63(2,Jun), 447-488. citation courtesy of

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